Posts tagged as: BASIX

The Greater Melbourne Alternative Water Plan

The RHAA is pleased to present this blog authored by Urban Water Cycle Solutions and Thirsty Country. Building design can fundamentally change how Melbourne households use water and how urban water is provided.

The Future of Australian Housing Design Breakfast Event

Josh ByrneThe Rainwater Harvesting Association has organised a breakfast to talk about Housing Design on 20 April in Sydney. Australia needs to build 4 million new houses in Australia by 2036, a 50% increase from 2011. What do we want and what do we need from these houses? Almost every article we read about sustainable houses seems to include rainwater harvesting, solar panels, passive design features. These features clearly work so why do so many of  us have houses without them? What should we do to build great houses and reduce our costs, enjoy our houses more, pay less taxes, and raise healthy families?

Household water expenditure, utility operating costs, desalination

Authors: Prof. PJ Coombes and Michael Smit   “Water bills to rise as desal plant gets the go-ahead to start making water for the first time”   This heading, from a newspaper article in The Age on 6 March, caught our eye from our respective desks, so we called up and had a yarn, and some questions came up for us. We typically investigate multiple data sources to fully understand these issues. We make a living from these kinds of questions but some of the answers were a little startling.

A Sustainable Building Policy for Australia

BASIX five year outcomes summaryAbout 4 million new Australian households are projected by 2036, a 50% increase from 2011. (ABS, 2015).  The design standards for these buildings are fundamental to future urban energy and water needs but performance based water and energy saving targets are missing or not consistent across Australia.

More houses, less water?

BASIX five year outcomes summaryWe are going to need a lot of houses in Australia. About 4 million new households are projected by 2036, a 50% increase from 2011. (ABS, 2015).   These houses will need additional infrastructure for electricity and especially water. How do we manage this? It is an important question because the millennium drought demonstrated finding more supply is expensive. Water and sewerage bills rose by 38% from 2005 to 2014. (BOM, 2015).